Chilling Video Captures Roger Hussey's Parasailing Death on Kata Beach Phuket

  • Chilling Video Captures Roger Hussey's Parasailing Death on Kata Beach Phuket

Chilling Video Captures Roger Hussey's Parasailing Death on Kata Beach Phuket

A businessman from Australia fell 70 metres (230 feet) to his death while parasailing in southern Thailand, police said on Thursday. This was before a boat pulled him and a local, who was not harnessed, into the air.

Beachgoers rushed to help Hussey, who was reportedly having difficulty breathing after he was pulled from the sea.

"As an experienced board member he brought with him valuable business acumen including strategic planning and corporate governance skills which put our organisation on a strong footing into the future".

Police in Phuket confirmed two men had been charged.

According to The Sun, the two staff involved - parasailer Rungroj Rakscheep, 38, and boat captain Montien Chandeng, 45, have been charged over the incident.

"The equipment was not up to standard and the parachute attendant failed to tell his victim to hold the ropes in the correct position", he added, saying Hussey died in hospital.

Ms Tongsanga said Hussey had been watching people parasail for days before he made a decision to do it. "We thought it was safe", she said.

According to 7 News, Mr Hussey's grieving children posted tributes to the 71-year-old on social media.

Officers said Mr Hussey had "red marks on his body" from when he is believed to have hit the water.

In a statement, Landgate described Hussey as an "intelligent and energetic contributor" to its board and western Australia's business community.

He was the deputy chairman of Landgate for five years, and recently stepped down as chair of the Perron Institute of Neurological and Translational Science and as a director for not-for-profit aged care provider Bethanie.

Tourism is a crucial pillar of Thailand's economy. But safety measures are not always strictly enforced.

Authorities often launch prosecutions after fatal accidents occur, but critics say few checks are made to ensure easily avoidable tragedies do not happen in the first place.