Artist's pressure forces Twitter to take minimal action against anti-Semitism

  • Artist's pressure forces Twitter to take minimal action against anti-Semitism

Artist's pressure forces Twitter to take minimal action against anti-Semitism

"The statements I reported weren't just plain insults or jokes, but absolutely serious threats of violence".

Shahak Shapira painted 30 anti-Semitic, homophobic, Islamophobic, and racist tweets outside the company's German headquarters in Hamburg.

He mentioned that Facebook removed 80 percent of the comments that he had reported in the same six month period.

"Muslim scum", reads one tweet, "Jewish pig", reads another, while one uses a commonly used racial slur and describes black people as "a plague".

A video posted on Monday (7 August) shows Shahak Shapira spray-painting messages like, "Germany needs a final solution to Islam", "Let's gas the Jews" and "N*****s are a plague to our society" on the ground next to the entrance to Twitter's building. The 24-hour-review percentage still lags behind Facebook, which reviewed 58%, and YouTube, which took action 43% of the time. In all of the replies, the company said that the reported tweets didn't violate the site's rules.

In its terms of service, Twitter says it "prohibits the promotion of hate speech globally" on the basis of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, and gender identity, among other factors.

Germany has one of the world's toughest laws as far as hate speech is concerned.

According to the artist, Twitter does not consider this "hate speech, ' which begs the question, what does Twitter consider to be 'hate speech"?!

"It angers me that most people don't revolt against this", one man said.

This is not the first time Shapira has sought to draw attention to hateful messages on social media.

An Israeli-German artist known for his "YOLOCAUST" project combining selfies taken at Berlin's Holocaust memorial with images of concentration camp victims releases video of his latest work taking aim at social media giant Twitter's failure to address online anti-Semitism and racism.

"Now, Twitter has to look at the messages they ignore so much", Shapira said.

Unlike their digital inspiration, numerous messages sprayed on the sidewalk closest to the entrance to the Twitter offices were removed by a street cleaner several hours after Shapira painted them.